Have a Question? Call Now to Speak to a CPA

(559)421-7033
11Jul 2014

Six Tips For Turning Your Hobby Into Your Job- #FrugalFri.

2989488084_35c73c11e7_z

Source: Flickr

1. Teach others to do what you love. Teach piano lessons, offer cooking classes, or teach another language, if those are your passions. “You can do this by teaching through a college or continuing education program, by creating your own classes, or by creating your own webinars or tele-seminar series online,” Collamer says.

 

2. Sell/import/invent/craft a product or accessory for enthusiasts in your hobby. For example, if you are a wine enthusiast, you might import hand-blown wine glasses from a different country, or invent a unique wine-themed refrigeration device, or develop a line of fun wine-themed t-shirts. “Hobbyists tend to be very enthusiastic, passionate and willing to spend money on items related to their hobby, “ Collamer says. “Just think of what baseball enthusiasts are willing to pay for World Series tickets.”

 

  1. Teach the business of the hobby. So let’s say your background is in publishing, but you love cooking, you could specialize in teaching people in the food industry how to get their cookbooks published.

 

4. Speak or write about your hobby. “Hobby related how-to-topics, historical perspectives, and compelling stories, are all of interest to enthusiasts,” Collamer says. And you could get paid to do it.

 

5. Create a tour or performance series around what you love. “The other day I met a woman who bills herself as a “Founding Fathers Fanatic” and she perfroms ar schools, in character, to teach students about the Founding Fathers,” Collamer says. “Another example of this is Tony Mula, who turned his love of pizza and Brooklyn into the highly successful ‘A Slice of Brooklyn’ pizza tours,” she adds. “I also know of a bike enthusiast who runs bike tours in California.”

 

6. Appraise, repair or fix items related to what you love. Most hobbies have “stuff” connected to them, and sometimes, that stuff needs to be fixed by a skilled and knowledgeable person. “You could fix computers, appraise collectibles, repair bicycles, source missing parts for highly unusual items, and so on,” Collamer says.

 

Originally posted and shared from: http://onforb.es/1g68iS9, by Jacquelyn Smith, October 7, 2013 1:15 PM

 

Comments are closed.